Tag Archives: Sweden Swedish

Clarify your goals for learning Swedish – or any language

Goals for Learning Swedish

Goal setting is a must. Yes you have heard it before. I know. Hopefully you also practice it. Sometimes the goal for learning Swedish is “I want to be fluent” or “I want to be able to speak without FEAR”. But being a bit more specific is a wise strategy for acquiring language skills, as well as any skill. Here is some inspiration for the language learner. One of my Swedish via Skype students was recently interviewed by Digitala Affärer about learning Swedish, and her clear and highly rewarding goal of being able to participate in a Swedish conference. In Sweden. In Swedish! Link to article at bottom of post.

 

Goals for Learning Swedish – our strategy?

  • Watching videos of speeches from for instance Webbdagarna (“the Web Days”)
  1. listening comprehension
  2. summarizing; written or oral presentation
  3. reviewing, reflecting and criticizing
  4. comparing (use of language, articulation, topics)
  • “Analyzing” web pages on the topic – anything from WebCoast to small business companies within web design

 

  • Collecting internet and web related words to build glossary

 

  • Reading newspaper and magazine articles – practicing scanning and summarizing without preparation

 

  • And most importantly working towards a high confidence in speaking the Swedish language

Since the conference was scheduled we had a time frame. The work was of course always done with an eye on grammar and structure, remembering acquiring new vocabulary, pronunciation and learning about Swedish culture and phenomena!

Here is the article over at Digitala Affärer.

Link to Christas impressions of the conference

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Swedish children’s literature

Swedish children’s literature

Who haven’t heard of Pippi and Astrid Lindgren? But there’s more to it when it comes to Swedish children’s literature. When I was living abroad Swedish children’s books – in Swedish – were very important to me and hopefully to my kids too. Luggage was heavy every time we returned after a visit to Sweden. I bought tons of books.

Today, being back in Sweden, we enjoy the libraries and spend less money – not time – on books. We still carry loads home every week.

Read about Swedish children’s literature here. Did you know difficult subjects are often brought up and dealt with? Personally, I love Goodbye Mr Muffin (Adjö, herr Muffin) by Ulf Nilsson.

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Growing up in Sweden

Growing up in Sweden

What does it mean to be a child in Sweden? Growing up in Sweden has many benefits.

Learn about school and vacation, family and leisure time, culture, hobbies and joining a club. What is Swedish children’s literature and do all parents work? Is there a support system for the young and how many children really play an instrument?

www.sweden.se shares the full story on Growing up in Sweden.

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Lars Winnerbäck – Swedish music

Swedish music – in Swedish

Swedish music – in Swedish. Far more popular today than a couple of decades ago when English was the only thinkable language if you wanted to grow a career as an artist.

Music is very much a part of a country’s culture. It is a way to stay connected to the home culture and language once you move abroad, as well as an excellent way to learn a new language and connect with the culture in a hosting country.

I sometimes get questions about recommendations for Swedish music – where the singing is done in Swedish. I usually share it on twitter or e-mail, or in person. I have also done a few blog posts on the topic earlier. Today it crossed my mind; why not make it a series of blog posts? So here goes; a post in the series Swedish music – in Swedish.

Today I present Lars Winnerbäck and his song Utkast till ett brev (Draft for a Letter)

Swedish music – in Swedish for learning the lingo

Since I am teaching Swedish on-line, I sometimes make glossaries for Swedish music to give my students, together with links to videos and texts. You can find an example here.

 

Swedish genealogy vocabulary

Swedish genealogy vocabulary

If you have Swedish ancestors and are interested in genealogy the language barrier might be a problem unless you speak Swedish. Many words found on old documents cannot be found in regular on-line dictionaries. Here is a link to a website covering many words associated with genealogy; from English to Swedish.

If you need from Swedish to English take a peek at this website.

Good luck!

 

Read in Swedish – website with samples

Read in Swedish

Reading is learning. Reading is traveling. I would say that to read is to rest and activate the brain at the same time – depending on what you are reading and what the purpose of it is.

I have not yet taken to read books on a tablet. I prefer to hold the book, flip through the crispy pages, smell the paper and insert post-its where I find something memorable. I also love a nice cover. I usually read in Swedish or English, but try to read at least a couple of books in German every year too. I think it is a good way to keep up the language and also to learn new words; especially the new, trendier words.

Read in Swedish – samples

Despite my love for the physical book I don’t mind reading shorter texts on a screen. There’s a webpage I use where you can read extracts from books published in Sweden. This is useful and inspiring when you look for something to read in Swedish. But it is not only valuable to native speakers – I also sometimes use it for my Swedish classes.

The website is www.provlas.se

Here are a few tips on what to read if you are learning Swedish – children or adults, beginners or advanced, first language or second!

Any good reads lately? In Swedish I am currently reading “En man som heter Ove”

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#seetheworld Twitter Chat on Sweden is coming up!

#seetheworld

Join the Twitter chat on Sweden Aug 14! The community of #seetheworld will share and learn about Sweden! Whether you have already been to Sweden or not, live here or don’t, know something about it or nothing at all – come join us! This is a nice opportunity to chat about Sweden with fellow curious twitter friends. And, to connect with new friends! We all want to #seetheworld!

To join the conversation log in to Twitter and follow the hashtag #SeeTheWorld.

You can also follow

me, the co-host, @globatris

the founders @theCultureur and @RovingAltruist

and of course @SeeTheWorldChat

https://twitter.com/thecultureur/status/365212764148473856

Learn the Swedish language by listening to music

Learn the Swedish language by listening to music

Learning a language it is beneficial to listen to and sing along to music in that language. You learn new words but more importantly you get a sense of the rhythm and intonation of the language, as well as learning pronunciation.

Below is a link to a popular summer song in Swedish, by Tomas Ledin. It is called “Sommaren är kort” – summer is short.

video with sing-along text.

To learn the Swedish language by listening to music you need to pick up the words in the song. I have made a Sommaren är kort – glosor translating Swedish into English.

Sing along!

Top Ten Tips for Moving to Sweden

Top Ten Tips For Moving To Sweden

1)      Securing employment in Sweden can be a bit of a challenge. Often, the language barrier can be an issue, but as a native English speaker you will have an advantage among other expatriates.

2)      Many English expatriates opt to become teachers at international schools. Having a British Post Graduate Certificate in Education is an asset as well as an intermediate level of Swedish. However, the qualifications will vary depending on your teaching level and school board.

3)      You can find work online through company websites or through Arbetsförmedlingen, which is the largest job placement website in Sweden. You may also find work through Stepstone, Thelocal.se or Monster, which are also popular search engines.

4)      Similar to other Scandinavian countries, the Swedish healthcare system is funded by taxpayers; however as with many other nations, the public health care system does not cover optometry, dentistry, or orthodontics to name a few.

5)      Prescription medication must be provided by a physician, and it is provided through your personnummer then sent directly to the network of drugstores across the country. Thus, it is very important to receive this number as you will need it for many things.

6)      When visiting a doctor, you may be required to pay a small fee of about 150 to 300 SEK. After 1,100 SEK have been paid within one year, further healthcare will be provided free of charge.

7)      Primary education in Sweden is mandatory for children between the ages of 6/7 and 15/16 and it s free. Children can attend pre-school (förskola) between the ages of 1 to 5. Pre school is very common in Sweden as it aids in the child’s development and learning.

8)      There are also a few options available for private schooling. Within greater Stockholm, you will find Sigtunaskolan, which offers boarding for boys and girls. Another notable private school is Lundbergs skola, which is located within proximity of Kristinehamn.

9)      Higher Education institutions offer programs taught entirely in English or in Swedish. Sweden is home to many internationally recognized universities such as Uppsala University, Lund University and The Stockholm School of Economics.

10)   You may also choose to learn Swedish through private institutions such as Folkuniversitetet or you may seek Swedish courses at a higher education institution. However, Swedish courses at a university are not publicly funded. Alternatively, many private firms offer Swedish language training to expatriates.

 

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Why the word out there really is international

International words

We love to travel and expatriate all over the globe. These days we connect on line with almost every country, and languages spread and sometimes mix. At least single words. There are loanwords, there are words mixed from two languages we often refer to as Swenglish (svengelska) or Frenglish (franglais) and so on, and there are international words. An international word is a great buddy when learning a foreign language. It makes it easier for you to start speaking and understand the language (but watch out for so called false friends!). A brief explanation of the international word follows, from a language perspective.

 

An international word is a word that

  • is spelled or pronounced similar in different languages, that are not related to each other
  • has the same or at least the similar meaning
  • shares etymology (history of the word)

The word following the description above – again referring to linguistics – is also called an internationalism. There are no set rules on how many languages the word needs to be detected in to be called international. Different major cultural areas can have their own set of internationalisms.

 

Here are a few examples in the Swedish language – I’m sure you recognize them:

polis

radio

blogg

fotboll

golf

taxi

stress

tsunami

hotell

maskin

mikrofon

visum

komedi

transport

 

Can you think of more words?

here is a link to English international words

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Some international words in the Swedish language